Thursday, March 20, 2008

Ce Soir


Please join us on Thursday, March 20 at 7 p.m. for the next reading in the Community and World Literary Series at California State University, San Marcos, featuring Edwin Torres.

The reading will be held on the Cal State San Marcos campus in Markstein Hall Room 125. The event is free and open to the public, but there is a fee for on-campus parking.

Edwin Torres has collaborated with a wide range of artists, creating performances that intermingle poetry with vocal & physical improvisation, sound-elements and visual theater. He has received poetry fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, The Foundation For Contemporary Performance Art, The Poets Fund and The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. He has taught workshops at Naropa University, St. Marks Poetry Project, Bard College, Mills College and Miami University, among others. His work has been widely published and his CD Holy Kid (Kill Rock Stars Records) was part of The Whitney Museum’s exhibition, The American Century Pt. II. His books include I Hear Things People Haven’t Really Said, Fractured Humorous (Subpress), The All-Union Day Of The Shock Worker (Roof Books) and The PoPedology Of An Ambient Language (Atelos Books).

Event Information:

Thursday, March 20, 7 p.m.
Markstein Hall, Room 125
California State University, San Marcos
333 S. Twin Oaks Valley Rd.
Campus Maps and Directions: http://www.csusm.edu/resources/images/maps/
For more information, or to sign on to our mailing list to receive announcements of future events, check out our website:
http://www.csusm.edu/cwls/

4 comments:

mike said...

please send me a plane ticket.
i'll buy the beer.

K. Lorraine Graham said...

Good G-d, if I could buy plane tickets for my friends to come visit me, I'd already be doing it. And also buying a lot of plane tickets for me to go visit them.

Todd Colby said...

Edwin is so wonderful.

I bet it was terrific.

K. Lorraine Graham said...

He did give a really good performance--and he knows how to perform in front of an audience that doesn't necessarily have any context for the kind of work he does (which, in this case, was really important).